Jon Hall

Remarkable work by Thomas Doyle.

Remarkable work by Thomas Doyle.

“The Bauhaus was not only the most famous art school of the twentieth century, it was also an idea: an idea that continues to influence all of our lives.” — Doreen Ehrlich
The Manifesto and Programme of Bauhaus, written in 1919 by Walter Gropius (who would later become the first and more prominent Director of Bauhaus), is intriguing. It calls for artists to return to the way of the craftsman, to work with their hands, to make art, to, in effect, embrace the practical. As a result, Bauhaus championed art, design, architecture and theatre, together in collaborative environments. It railed against the Bourgeois of the day and formed not just a school, but an idea, an idea that went on to achieve immeasurable influence. 
Bauhaus came to an abrupt end in 1933 when the Nazi’s rise to power called for the end of what they referred to as “degenerative art,” effectively ending the Bauhaus school and another fine art movement of the day, German Expressionism. Every occupying force knows the power of art and design, and the need to tightly control it as part of controlling the people. The Nazi’s supplanted these powerful creative movements with their own approved art, driven deeply by Hitler’s own involvement in art and his realization of its power and influence.
“The Bauhaus was not only the most famous art school of the twentieth century, it was also an idea: an idea that continues to influence all of our lives.” — Doreen Ehrlich
The Manifesto and Programme of Bauhaus, written in 1919 by Walter Gropius (who would later become the first and more prominent Director of Bauhaus), is intriguing. It calls for artists to return to the way of the craftsman, to work with their hands, to make art, to, in effect, embrace the practical. As a result, Bauhaus championed art, design, architecture and theatre, together in collaborative environments. It railed against the Bourgeois of the day and formed not just a school, but an idea, an idea that went on to achieve immeasurable influence. 
Bauhaus came to an abrupt end in 1933 when the Nazi’s rise to power called for the end of what they referred to as “degenerative art,” effectively ending the Bauhaus school and another fine art movement of the day, German Expressionism. Every occupying force knows the power of art and design, and the need to tightly control it as part of controlling the people. The Nazi’s supplanted these powerful creative movements with their own approved art, driven deeply by Hitler’s own involvement in art and his realization of its power and influence.
“The Bauhaus was not only the most famous art school of the twentieth century, it was also an idea: an idea that continues to influence all of our lives.” — Doreen Ehrlich
The Manifesto and Programme of Bauhaus, written in 1919 by Walter Gropius (who would later become the first and more prominent Director of Bauhaus), is intriguing. It calls for artists to return to the way of the craftsman, to work with their hands, to make art, to, in effect, embrace the practical. As a result, Bauhaus championed art, design, architecture and theatre, together in collaborative environments. It railed against the Bourgeois of the day and formed not just a school, but an idea, an idea that went on to achieve immeasurable influence. 
Bauhaus came to an abrupt end in 1933 when the Nazi’s rise to power called for the end of what they referred to as “degenerative art,” effectively ending the Bauhaus school and another fine art movement of the day, German Expressionism. Every occupying force knows the power of art and design, and the need to tightly control it as part of controlling the people. The Nazi’s supplanted these powerful creative movements with their own approved art, driven deeply by Hitler’s own involvement in art and his realization of its power and influence.
“The Bauhaus was not only the most famous art school of the twentieth century, it was also an idea: an idea that continues to influence all of our lives.” — Doreen Ehrlich
The Manifesto and Programme of Bauhaus, written in 1919 by Walter Gropius (who would later become the first and more prominent Director of Bauhaus), is intriguing. It calls for artists to return to the way of the craftsman, to work with their hands, to make art, to, in effect, embrace the practical. As a result, Bauhaus championed art, design, architecture and theatre, together in collaborative environments. It railed against the Bourgeois of the day and formed not just a school, but an idea, an idea that went on to achieve immeasurable influence. 
Bauhaus came to an abrupt end in 1933 when the Nazi’s rise to power called for the end of what they referred to as “degenerative art,” effectively ending the Bauhaus school and another fine art movement of the day, German Expressionism. Every occupying force knows the power of art and design, and the need to tightly control it as part of controlling the people. The Nazi’s supplanted these powerful creative movements with their own approved art, driven deeply by Hitler’s own involvement in art and his realization of its power and influence.
“The Bauhaus was not only the most famous art school of the twentieth century, it was also an idea: an idea that continues to influence all of our lives.” — Doreen Ehrlich
The Manifesto and Programme of Bauhaus, written in 1919 by Walter Gropius (who would later become the first and more prominent Director of Bauhaus), is intriguing. It calls for artists to return to the way of the craftsman, to work with their hands, to make art, to, in effect, embrace the practical. As a result, Bauhaus championed art, design, architecture and theatre, together in collaborative environments. It railed against the Bourgeois of the day and formed not just a school, but an idea, an idea that went on to achieve immeasurable influence. 
Bauhaus came to an abrupt end in 1933 when the Nazi’s rise to power called for the end of what they referred to as “degenerative art,” effectively ending the Bauhaus school and another fine art movement of the day, German Expressionism. Every occupying force knows the power of art and design, and the need to tightly control it as part of controlling the people. The Nazi’s supplanted these powerful creative movements with their own approved art, driven deeply by Hitler’s own involvement in art and his realization of its power and influence.

“The Bauhaus was not only the most famous art school of the twentieth century, it was also an idea: an idea that continues to influence all of our lives.”
— Doreen Ehrlich

The Manifesto and Programme of Bauhaus, written in 1919 by Walter Gropius (who would later become the first and more prominent Director of Bauhaus), is intriguing. It calls for artists to return to the way of the craftsman, to work with their hands, to make art, to, in effect, embrace the practical. As a result, Bauhaus championed art, design, architecture and theatre, together in collaborative environments. It railed against the Bourgeois of the day and formed not just a school, but an idea, an idea that went on to achieve immeasurable influence. 

Bauhaus came to an abrupt end in 1933 when the Nazi’s rise to power called for the end of what they referred to as “degenerative art,” effectively ending the Bauhaus school and another fine art movement of the day, German Expressionism. Every occupying force knows the power of art and design, and the need to tightly control it as part of controlling the people. The Nazi’s supplanted these powerful creative movements with their own approved art, driven deeply by Hitler’s own involvement in art and his realization of its power and influence.

June 2013. The evenings in the Old City were my favorite time there. Compared to the loud, tourist-driven days, the evenings were for the locals, a more subdued and conversational reality. It was about 9pm when I shot this in the Muslim Quarter. There were women selling produce, men woodworking, tailors sewing. 

June 2013. The evenings in the Old City were my favorite time there. Compared to the loud, tourist-driven days, the evenings were for the locals, a more subdued and conversational reality. It was about 9pm when I shot this in the Muslim Quarter. There were women selling produce, men woodworking, tailors sewing. 

Street art by Blue, Rome, Italy.

Street art by Blue, Rome, Italy.

robertogreco:


“A giant art installation project that targets predator drone operators sitting thousands of miles away who refer to kills as BugSplats. Now they’ll see a child’s face instead." (via Matt)


Wow. Wow. Wow. 

Citizens and readers will have to fund the journalism they want to preserve and cultivate.

Scott Lewis (@vosdscott). True words for journalism, and so many other things that matter.

99percentinvisible:

mesmerizing. 

Impressed.

Photographer Klaus Leidorf’s Aerial Archaeology
Photographer Klaus Leidorf’s Aerial Archaeology
Photographer Klaus Leidorf’s Aerial Archaeology
Photographer Klaus Leidorf’s Aerial Archaeology

Photographer Klaus Leidorf’s Aerial Archaeology

My first computer, 1986, a Mac Plus.

My first computer, 1986, a Mac Plus.

(via teachingliteracy)